‘Two College Girls’ uses young adult ‘sex in college’ anxiety to examine white privilege

University-aged girls are better off not going to college than it turns out. “Two College Girls,” a coming-of-age comedy starring Christa B. Allen and Louisa Krause, taps into the anxiety and anxiety-inducing sexual choices…

‘Two College Girls’ uses young adult 'sex in college' anxiety to examine white privilege


University-aged girls are better off not going to college than it turns out. “Two College Girls,” a coming-of-age comedy starring Christa B. Allen and Louisa Krause, taps into the anxiety and anxiety-inducing sexual choices made by young women arriving at the end of their years before matriculation.

Set on the east coast, it centers on 18-year-old Ali (Alia Shawkat), who is “prepped” to enroll in “her school of choice,” the University of Cincinnati, right after high school. Things start off ok; she commits to a liaison with what she thinks is a nice, nerdy guy named Jake (Tyler Labine), but who is actually playing a twisted joke on her.

From here, the film rides Ali’s transition from face-paced suburban university to dorm life — and features all of the iconic sex scenes you might expect. But the script by Vanessa Miller also turns toward a less-expected form of sexual exploration: friendships forged between university students over their chemistry with boys.

The film is mostly held together by its four young actresses, two of whom recur in later roles. Although it succeeds in establishing its first-rate personalities, it cannot help but lead us to wonder: Did college campuses used to be more segregated than they are today? Were they, therefore, a product of conservative rule?

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